Complex Income and Mortgages

Do you consider your income complex?

In today’s world, you’d be surprised to discover just how many people do. The number of people working in more traditional nine to five jobs is shrinking on an annual basis. More people now have more than one job or have opted to become self-employed, meaning that actual earned income can be an accumulation of salaries.

Even though job structures have evolved so much over the years, there are still plenty of mortgage lenders on the high street who won’t consider applications from people who don’t receive a regular salary. This could be due to the potential risk involved in lending to someone who may not have a consistent and traditional income structure.

complex income

So, what exactly does complex income mean?

In a nutshell, income is classed as complex if it’s made up of various different sources and/or fluctuates on a monthly basis.

For those who earn their money through a combination of different means such bonuses,, commissions, pensions, or overtime, it can be a little more difficult to gather all the proof of total income when applying for a mortgage.

Though it may be a little tougher, it is definitely not impossible to get a mortgage with an atypical income type. As someone with a more complex income structure, you’ll want to ensure that all your sources of income are shared with lenders. They need to understand ALL the taxable income you receive so you can be accessed fairly & gain access to the full amount available..

There are different requirements for different types of complex incomes.

Read on for our list of the different types of incomes classed as complex, and what you need to do for your mortgage application if you fall under any of these:

Overtime bonuses and/or commissions

If you regularly receive overtime, bonuses or commissions on top of your basic salary, you’ll want this to be accounted for in the affordability assessment. You’ll need to show mortgage lenders a minimum of your last 3 payslips and P60. This may be extended if the payments aren’t regular & where it’s an annual payment you’ll probably need to prove the payment has been received over the past three years to prove it’s not a one-off payment. Every lender will assess differently, but many will let you use the full amount while others may work out an average to decide how much you can afford to borrow.

Benefits and child maintenance

If you receive any sort of government benefits such as child maintenance on top of your regular income, these could potentially support your mortgage application depending on the lender. These can include anything from disability benefits to child tax credits.  You’ll need to provide proof from the relevant authorities along with bank or building society statements to allow inclusion in the assessment.

Keep in mind that if you don’t have an income other than benefits, most lenders may not consider your application. You’ll need to reach out to those lenders that are open to it.

Freelance income from self-employment

For those of you who are self-employed, you will be able to find many mortgage providers that are willing to lend to you, though there will be more paperwork involved! You’ll need to show your latest 2 to 3 years accounts and earnings. Some lenders will work with just one year’s accounts for those new to self-employed but a rate penalty will probably apply.

More than one source of income

If you have a second job which is giving you a regular source of additional income, this will be considered by mortgage providers when they’re carrying out the affordability assessment. As long as the second job has been worked for more than 12 months & it’s seen to be achievable going forward.

Pensions

For those mortgage applicants that are currently living off their pension income, getting approved can be quite tough. However, if you have a good credit history and a larger pension income, there are some lenders out there who may be willing to consider your application.

You’ll need to provide all pension-related documents as proof, such as the statements of your annual pension income.

Rental Income

Proof of rental income is usually used by a lender to confirm that the rental property is self-funding. Rarely is the excess income used as part of your affordability assessment. However, that said, some lenders will use the excess income as part of your affordability.

Conclusion

We hope the above list has helped you understand a little bit more about complex mortgages. Hopefully, it has also made clear that though you may have a few more forms to fill and paperwork to show, many lenders will accept your mortgage application with the necessary supporting proof.

Though this list covers the most common types of ‘complex’ incomes, there are many other income structures out there. To increase your chances of getting a complex income mortgage offer, we’d recommend seeking assistance from a mortgage specialist. An independent mortgage adviser will be able to help you ensure all your income is accounted so that your affordability assessment is fully accurate.

For further advice or to arrange your appointment please contact ZING on 03332 414113 or email sales@zing-mortgages.co.uk